Document Type

Article

Abstract

The advent of the computer-age in the mid to late 20th century brought the development of sophisticated scientific equipment for myriad chemical analyses. The field of spectroscopy alone has seen significant advances in data collection, processing, and analysis due principally to the incorporation of microprocessors. While it is clear computers have revolutionized the field of instrumental chemical analysis their impact is pervasive through every segment of our lives. From word processing, data management, and Computer Aided Design in our work environments to social media, crowd funding, and digital news at home, technology is everywhere. This work seeks to incorporate the relatively new field of 3D printing into the design and “at-home” manufacture of optomechanical equipment for open-space spectroscopy. The primary goals were the design of an optical cage system, with associated accessories, that is printable on any entry- level commercially available 3D printer. All components except the optics, light source, camera, breadboard, and integrated fluorescence accessory mount were either parametrically designed and printed or purchasable at a local hardware store. The components were assembled into a Michelson interferometer and a liquid sample accessory for Raman spectroscopy. Results of both configurations are discussed along with full cost analysis.

Publication Title

HardwareX

Volume

3

First Page

62

Last Page

81

Publication Date

4-1-2018

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ohx.2017.12.001

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